sábado, 26 de noviembre de 2011

PLANEACIÓN INGLÉS II SECUNDARIA BLOQUES 1,2,3,4,5 2011-2012




ZONA ESCOLAR O43, SECTOR O6, TEHUACÁN.
ESCUELA: ISAAC OCHOTERENA  CICLO ESCOLAR:    2011 - 2012   GRADO:        GRUPO: __”C”__
PROFESOR: INGLES II                                        FECHA: _________________      
Unit 1: People and Animals  
Propósito: 1.1. Expressing (in)ability in the present  Sample productions: He/She is a singer/an architect/…, he/she can sing very well/design buildings/…; Can you play the guitar/speak French/…?; Yes, I can; No, I can’t (, but I can play the harmonica/speak English/...).  1.2. Describing people and animals
Sample productions: Zebras are beautiful. They have black and white stripes. They live in the jungle. They eat grass.; Luis/Erika is medium height/thin/… and has big brown eyes. He/She is very nice; Is he/she curious/short/…?; Yes, he/she is; No, he/she isn’t; Do elephants have long ears/black eyes/…?; Yes, they do; No, they don’t; What does Luis/Erika look like?; He/She is tall and plump; What’s  Luis/Erika like?; He/She’s tall/responsible/…(. He/She always does her homework/arrives on time/…); What’s your dog like? It’s fat/lazy/…
LESSONS
TEAM

Social Practice

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE
REFLECTION ON LANGUAGE
STRATEGIC COMPETENCE

UNIT FOCUS
  1. Meeting your a new teacher
  2. This  is your schoolprincipal
  3. What time do you have your english class?
  4. Roxane gets up at six o’ clock
  5. mi uncle is stall and thin
  6. What does your teacher look like?
  7. Can you drive a car?
  8. Elephants have big ears and black eyes
  9. Whales are very intelligent.
  10. Whats i s your mother like?
  11. I sometimes play soccer
  12. How often do you go the movies?
  13. Do you now seahorses?
  14. Learn  about koalas
  15. Do animals have routines?
  16. What can animal do?
  17. Have you heard about white lions?
  18. Animals that live in your community
  19. My favorite athlete is Ana Guevara
  20. What animals do you like?
  21. Create a gallery of famous people
  22. Come to visit our gallery
  23. Who is it?
  24. Autoevaluación

Giving and obtaining factual information of a personal
and non-personal kind

1.1. Expressing (in)ability in the present
Sample productions: He/She is a singer/an architect/…, he/she can sing very well/design
buildings/…; Can you play the guitar/speak French/…?; Yes, I can; No, I can’t (, but I can play the
harmonica/speak English/...).
1.2. Describing people and animals
Sample productions: Zebras are beautiful. They have black and white stripes. They live in the
jungle. They eat grass.; Luis/Erika is medium height/thin/… and has big brown eyes. He/She is
very nice; Is he/she curious/short/…?; Yes, he/she is; No, he/she isn’t; Do elephants have long
ears/black eyes/…?; Yes, they do; No, they don’t; What does Luis/Erika look like?; He/She is
tall and plump; What’s Luis/Erika like?; He/She’s tall/responsible/…(. He/She always does her
homework/arrives on time/…); What’s your dog like? It’s fat/lazy/
sudents can recognise and understand quotidian texts (classified advertisements, letters/emails,
magazine/newspaper articles and conversations) in order to use them purposefully (obtain
information/learn about people’s and animals’ (in)abilities, appearance and qualities, habits/
routines).
– Can use knowledge of the world and clues (illustrations) to make predictions about the texts.
– Can identify the overall message and some details ((in)abilities, physical characteristics, routines/
habits) and discriminate relevant from irrelevant information, in order to identify a person or his/
her main actions/habits/routines, complete/expand a text and/or respond to a conversation.
• – Can infer age, sex, feelings, attitudes, location and situation of others.
– Can infer the meaning of some adjectives used for describing people from the context within which
they are presented, and/or by recognising synonyms (e.g. thin–slim) and antonyms (e.g. tall–short),
based on content as well as on knowledge of the world and/or L1.
– Can discriminate final consonant sounds used in can (/kæn/ or /k n/) and can’t (/kænt/).
Students can recognise and understand academic texts (articles about the routines of animals or groups
of people) in order to compare with the rest of the class their own interpretation and judgement of such
texts.
– Can relate main ideas to examples, descriptions and explanations about the routine of an animal or
group of people.
– Can use maps, photographs and charts in texts to increase their knowledge about the animal or
group of people described.
Students can recognise and understand short literary texts (tales, fragments of poems and stories) in
order to comment on the feelings generated by them.
– Can identify characters and main events.
Students can use language creatively and appropriately by selecting lexis, phrases and grammatical
resources in order to produce short, relevant texts (classified advertisement, letter/e-mail, article,
conversation) regarding peoples’ and/or animals’ (in)abilities, physical characteristics, and habits/
routines.
– Can use knowledge of the world to anticipate type of information required, expected ways of
interaction and possible language needed when describing people and their routines.
– Can pronounce intelligibly strong and weak vowel sounds when using modal verbs (can /kæn//
k n/).
– Can identify the purpose for writing a description of people and/or animals, intended audience and
type of text required (classified advertisement, letter/e-mail, article); and generate and organise ideas
coherently with the help of peers, the teacher or by consulting different sources of information.
– Can produce a skeleton of the text to be written, identifying and establishing the basic organisation
of components (classified advertisement: heading, body; letter/e-mail, article: introduction, body,
conclusions), with the help of peers, the teacher or a similar text.
– Can produce individual sentences in preparation to write a classified advertisement, letter/e-mail,
article, and join them later using some linking devices (“,”, and, but, or) in order to make the text
coherent.
– Can concentrate separately on content or form, with the help of peers, the teacher or similar texts, to
make adequate corrections on a first draft and produce a final version of the text.
– Can illustrate appropriately the classified advertisement or article produced.
Students notice:
• that the modal verb can indicates present ability
and has a regular form for all persons
• the meaning of What’s something/someone like?
when used in the context of descriptions
• that adjectives have a fixed order: size + colour
(e.g. She has big brown eyes)
• that some words are used to replace a proper
noun (e.g. Maria is a nurse She is kind
Everybody likes her Her cousin is a doctor)
• that some linking devices indicate addition
(“,”, and) while others indicate contrast (but), or
alternative (or)
and use such language features appropriately.
Students can use some verbal and/or non-verbal
information to ease and enrich communication.
– Can rely on gestures, facial expressions and
visual context.
– Can rely on background noise, tone of voice.
– Can adjust pace according to punctuation
marks when reading aloud/silently.
Students can recognise when confused and use
verbal and/or non-verbal language to repair
communication breakdowns.
– Can support message with gestures.
– Can refer to dictionary entries.
– Can ask for/give examples to illustrate
message.
– Can paraphrase.
– Can self-correct pronunciation.
– Can re-read.
Students can give/take the floor sensitively in
verbal and/or non-verbal ways.
– Can choose the most appropriate moment to
intervene.
– Can show sensitivity towards others.
Students can make sense of the organisation of
reference books (dictionaries, encyclopaedias,
textbooks) in order to look for help.
– Can check the spelling of unfamiliar words.
– Can look up unfamiliar words to find their
meaning.
This unit recycles language from 1st grade Unit 1, (occupations) and Unit 4, (describing routines), while
at the same time introduces language used to describe (in)ability, physical appearance and personal
qualities. Functions 1.1 and 1.2 should be treated sequentially first, and be integrated later on. Function
1.1 should be fairly easy for students and should take less time for presentation.
Function 1.2 heavily focuses on presentation of vocabulary used for descriptions (adjectives), and
integrates that with previous knowledge from 1st grade (Unit 4, the present simple tense for habits/ routines, as well as frequency adverbs). This function opens up possibilities for work with academic
texts. Internet is an excellent resource in order to find such texts for this unit. Some interesting places to
look for texts are http://www.kidsplanet.org, http://www.animaland.org, etc.
Writing may be evaluated by asking students to write an article regarding (in)abilities, physical
characteristics, and habits/routines of an animal or a group of people. Evaluation should concentrate
primarily on content and its organisation, as well as on the use of the modal verb can, adjectives, linkers
and prepositions.
Devote some time for students to create their portfolios. If they are not familiar with these, introduce
them and explain their use. The article students produced can be included in their portfolios.
To evaluate speaking, the teacher may ask students to prepare a presentation where they describe a famous
person and his/her (in)abilities. Oral evaluation should focus on specific areas, such as the appropriate
use of adjectives, the pronunciation of final consonant sound used in can and can’t, fluency, accuracy, etc.







ZONA ESCOLAR O43, SECTOR O6, TEHUACÁN.
ESCUELA: ISAAC OCHOTERENA  CICLO ESCOLAR:    2011 - 2012   GRADO:     2º   GRUPO: __”C”__
PROFESOR: INGLES II                                                   FECHA:_________________
      Unit 2: Health and the Body   Salud y el cuerpo
     UNIT PURPOSE:  The purpose of this unit is to enable students to give advice and make suggestions around the topic of health.
LESSONS
TEAM

Social Practice

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE
REFLECTION ON LANGUAGE
STRATEGIC COMPETENCE

UNIT FOCUS
  1. My head my arms and my legs
  2. Is she feelingOk?
  3. Do you feel sick?
  4. What’s the matter?
  5. You should stay in bed
  6. You shouldn’t go to bed late
  7. Mini check
  8. take some pill
  9. I would go to the dentist
  10. I wouldn’t use toothpicks
  11. A visit to the dentist
  12. Why don’t you go to the nutritionist?
  13. You’d better change your eating habits
  14. drink a cup of tea
  15. I have mumps
  16. Mini check
  17. Project: Drugs abuse and illegal Drugs Part one
  18. Project: Drugs abuse and illegal Drugs Part two
  19. Project: Drugs abuse and illegal Drugs Part three
  20. Project: Drugs abuse and illegal Drugs Part four
  21. Review


Giving and obtaining factual information of a personal
and non-personal kind
2.1. Discussing the body and one’s health
Sample productions: (I don’t feel well). I am/feel ill/dizzy/…; Is he/she fine/sick/…?; Yes, he/
she is; No, he/she isn’t; Do you feel OK/hot/…?; Yes, I do; No, I don’t; How is he/she?; How does
he/she feel?; He/She is/feels sick/better/…; What’s the problem/matter?; I have a headache/a
toothache/..., I have a cough/a cold/…

2.2. Giving advice
Sample productions: (You don’t look well. I think) You should go to the doctor/take an aspirin/…;
You shouldn’t go to school today/eat fat...; The best thing for you is to rest/drink a cup of tea/...;
If I were you, I would go to the dentist/see a specialist/…; If I were you, I wouldn’t go out/take
medicine without a prescription/…; Don’t eat junk food/have cold drinks/...; Try drinking a glass
of water/putting ointment on/...
2.3. Making and answering offers and suggestions
Sample productions: (Listen,) Why don’t you go to the dentist/put some ice on/...?; How about
staying in bed/taking a hot shower/…?; Should/Shall I call the doctor/bring you a cup of tea/…?;
Do you want me to take you to the hospital/phone your family/…?; That’s a good idea; That
would be nice; Thanks/Thank you (very much); I don’t think so; No (thanks/thank you), I’d rather
ask my doctor/stay at home/...
Students can recognise and understand quotidian texts (letters/e-mails, instructions, magazine/
newspaper articles and conversations) in order to use them purposefully (obtain/give advice, suggest
a solution/course of action, act according to instructions or treat a certain illness/discomfort).
– Can use knowledge of the world and clues (illustrations) to make predictions about the texts.
– Can identify the overall message and some details (symptoms, feelings or suggestions) and
discriminate relevant from irrelevant information, in order to deal with common health problems,
follow instructions, complete/expand a text and/or respond to a conversation.
– Can infer age, sex, feelings, attitudes, location and situation of others.
– Can infer the meaning of unfamiliar words related to health and the body from the context within
which they are presented, based on content as well as on knowledge of the world and/or L1.
– Can express own judgement and make recommendations about the information contained in texts
regarding health.
Students can use language creatively and appropriately by selecting lexis, phrases and grammatical
resources in order to produce short, relevant texts (letter/e-mail, set of instructions, conversation)
regarding health and the body.
– Can follow structured models of spoken/written language to give information about health and the
body.
– Can use knowledge of the world to anticipate type of information required, expected ways of
interaction and possible language needed when exchanging information about health and the
body.
– Can produce some fixed expressions with appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation when giving
advice, and when making suggestions.
– Can identify the purpose for writing about health, intended audience and type of text required
(letter/e-mail, set of instructions); and generate and organise ideas coherently with the help of
peers, the teacher or by consulting different sources of information.
– Can produce a skeleton of the text to be written, identifying and establishing the basic organisation
of components (letter/e-mail: introduction, body, conclusions), with the help of peers, the teacher
or a similar text.
– Can produce individual sentences in preparation to write a letter/e-mail or a set of instructions, and
join or sequence them later using some linking devices (“,”, and, because, or) in order to make the text
coherent.
– Can concentrate separately on content or form, with the help of peers, the teacher or similar texts, to
make adequate corrections on a first draft and produce a final version of the text.
Students notice:
• that the modal verb should is used to give advice
or make suggestions and has a regular form for
all persons
• that the imperative form is used to give medical
indications (e.g. Take three drops once a day, Don’t
drink cold water, Stay in bed, etc.)
• that some nouns have irregular plurals (e.g.
foot feet, tooth teeth)
• that a certain quantity of things that in general
are uncountable (e.g. cotton, water, tea, etc.) is
expressed using a quantifier followed by of and
uncountable nouns (e.g. a cup of tea, three drops of
syrup, a piece of cotton, etc.)
• the different meanings that a single term may
have depending on the context of use (sick)
• that some linking devices indicate addition (“,”,
and) while others indicate cause (because) or
alternative (or)
and use such language features appropriately
Students can use some verbal and/or non-verbal
information to ease and enrich communication.
– Can rely on gestures, facial expressions and
visual context.
– Can rely on background noise, tone of voice.
– Can adjust pace according to punctuation
marks when reading aloud/silently.
Students can recognise when confused and
cope with not being able to understand parts of
written/oral texts.
– Can wonder if a given text makes sense.
Students can recognise when confused and use
verbal and/or non-verbal language to repair
communication breakdowns.
– Can repeat/ask for repetition.
– Can support message with gestures.
– Can refer to dictionary entries.
– Can ask for/give examples to illustrate
message.
– Can paraphrase.
– Can re-read.
– Can ask for/give the spelling/meaning of a
word.
Students can give/take the floor sensitively in
verbal and/or non-verbal ways.
– Can initiate a conversation appropriately.
– Can choose the most appropriate moment to
intervene.
– Can show sensitivity towards others.
Students can make sense of the organisation of
reference books (dictionaries, encyclopaedias,
textbooks) in order to look for help.
– Can check the spelling of unfamiliar words.
– Can look up words to decide when they are
used.
– Can look up unfamiliar words to find their
meaning.
Functions 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3 can be treated in an integrated fashion. It is important to focus first on the
presentation of vocabulary, which can be introduced through a written text, and then move towards
discussing health problems and giving advice/suggestions.
Language for Functions 2.2 and 2.3 will only be used at a formulaic level, which means that the teacher
does not need to go into details about how phrases are formed. If the teacher wants to use Internet
resources, interesting texts can be found at http://health.discovery.com. Authentic texts with instructions
about how to use certain medicines can be found by searching the name of a product in any search
engine.
To evaluate oral skills, the teacher may set a situation in which two friends or patient and doctor talk
about an illness/ache and exchange symptoms and advice. Evaluation should focus on students’ ability
to convey meaning.
Students may do parallel writing of a set of instructions for a medicine. An alternative to evaluate writing
is to provide students with a letter/e-mail of a friend asking for advice to deal with a specific illness/ache
or personal problem and then have other students answer it giving appropriate advice. Again, evaluation
should focus on meaning, but attention should also be paid to appropriate use of grammatical areas and
vocabulary covered in this unit. Written production can later be included in students’ portfolios.

























ZONA ESCOLAR O43, SECTOR O6, TEHUACÁN.
ESCUELA: ISAAC OCHOTERENA  CICLO ESCOLAR:    2011 - 2012   GRADO:     2º   GRUPO: __”C”__
PROFESOR: INGLES II                                        FECHA: _________________       
       Unit 3: Shopping and Clothes
       Unit Purpose
        The purpose of this unit is to enable students to participate in conversations in which they compare, buy or sell a variety of items.
LESSONS
TEAM

Social Practice

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE
REFLECTION ON LANGUAGE
STRATEGIC COMPETENCE

UNIT FOCUS
  1. Look a this catalogue
  2. The jacket is comfortable
  3. The red T shirt is nice
  4. This green skirt is cool
  5. A laptop computer is practical
  6. Barbara is sporting a pair of modern earrings
  7. Mini check
  8. The pink dress is nicer than the red
  9. The red dress is ugly, but the green dress  is uglier
  10. Mathematics is more interesting
  11. Which apartment is bigger?
  12. The brown shoes are more comfortable than the black ones
  13. Practicing a sport is healthier
  14. My English homework
  15. Mini check
  16. Which is the smallest state in Mexico?
  17. Mexico is the most beautiful place in the world.
  18. The Rocker Band is the best
  19. Can I help you?
  20. Can you help me?
  21. Project: Garage sale  Part one
  22. Project: Garage sale  Part two
  23. Project: Garage sale  Part three
  24. review


Giving and obtaining factual information of a personal
and non-personal kind
3.1. Making comparisons/expressing degrees of difference
Sample productions: The red/This sweater is nicer/warmer… than the pink one/that one; It/
That black jacket is more fashionable/original/… than the beige one; Are these jeans/shorts/…
cheaper than those ones?; Are these jeans/shorts/…more expensive/comfortable/… than those
ones?; Yes, they are; No, they aren’t; Which are the best/cheapest/… shoes?; Which (ones) are the
most expensive/colourful/… jeans?; These/The green ones; Which (one) is nicer/larger/…?; The
red/This one; Which is more formal/fashionable/…? The grey/That one.
Social Practice
Carrying out certain transactions
3.2. Buying and selling things.
Sample productions: Can/May I help you?; I’m just looking (, thanks); Yes (, please); Do you have
this jacket/that blouse/… in grey/a larger size/…?; Would you like to try it/this coat/… on?; Yes,
please/thank you; Can I try it/the suit/… on?; Can you get me a larger/smaller size?; Certainly/Of
course (, sir/madam); What size do you need?; (I need) A medium one/9/… (, please); How much
are they/these shorts/…?; They’re $100/£2/…
Students can recognise and understand quotidian texts (advertisements, catalogues and conversations)
in order to use them purposefully (make comparisons, buy, sell, select, obtain information about
products).
– Can use knowledge of the world and clues (illustrations, realia) to make predictions about the
texts.
– Can identify the overall message and some details (prices/features of an object) and discriminate
relevant from irrelevant information, in order to make comparisons between two or more items,
identify prices, complete/expand a text and/or respond to a conversation.
– Can infer intentions and attitudes of others.
– Can infer from data provided by the text, knowledge of the world and/or L1, some implicit
information (location, target customers, price scale, quality and characteristics of product).
– Can infer the meaning of unfamiliar words related to shopping and clothes from the context within
which they are presented, and/or by recognising synonyms (e.g. big large) and antonyms (e.g.
cheap expensive), based on content as well as on knowledge of the world and/or L1.
– Can discriminate the particular sounds used in this /is/ and these /i:z/, and –ty /ti/ and –teen
/ti:n/.
– Can express own judgement and make recommendations about the information contained in texts
regarding items for sale.
Students can use language creatively and appropriately by selecting lexis, phrases and grammatical
resources in order to produce short, relevant texts (advertisement, catalogue, conversation) regarding
comparisons and buying/selling things.
– Can follow structured models of spoken/written language to give information about items for sale.
– Can use knowledge of the world to anticipate type of information required, expected ways of
interaction and possible language needed when comparing, and when buying/selling things.
– Can produce some fixed expressions with appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation when making
comparisons and purchases.
– Can pronounce intelligibly short and long vowel sounds that make a difference in meaning when
using demonstrative pronouns (this /is/ and these /i:z/).
– Can identify the purpose for writing a description of items for sale, intended audience and type of
text required (advertisement, catalogue); and generate and organise ideas coherently with the help
of peers, the teacher or by consulting different sources of information.
– Can produce individual sentences in preparation to write an advertisement, catalogue, and join them
later using some linking devices (because, or) in order to make the text coherent.
– Can concentrate separately on content or form, with the help of peers, the teacher or similar texts, to
make adequate corrections on a first draft and produce a final version of the text.
– Can illustrate appropriately the advertisement or catalogue produced.
Students notice:
• the implication of physical proximity or distance
when using singular (this that) and plural
demonstrative pronouns (these those)
• that the forms adjective + -er (...than) and more +
adjective (... than) indicate inequality
• that the forms the + adjective + -est and the most +
adjective indicate that one of a group is outstanding
in a particular way
• changes in spelling at the end of adjectives when
using their comparative and superlative forms
(e.g. big bigger biggest, pretty prettier
prettiest, large larger largest, cheap
cheaper cheapest, etc.)
• that some adjectives have irregular comparative
and superlative forms (e.g. good better best,
bad worse worst)
• the different meanings that a single term may
have depending on the context of use (dress, tie,
coat, glasses, watch, ring)
• that some linking devices indicate cause (because)
while others indicate alternative (or)
and use such language features appropriately.
Students can use some verbal and/or non-verbal
information to ease and enrich communication.
– Can rely on gestures, facial expressions and
visual context.
– Can rely on background noise, tone of voice.
Students can recognise when confused and
cope with not being able to understand parts of
written/oral texts.
– Can tolerate ambiguity.
Students can recognise when confused and use
verbal and/or non-verbal language to repair
communication breakdowns.
– Can repeat/ask for repetition.
– Can support message with gestures.
– Can self-correct pronunciation.
Students can give/take the floor sensitively in
verbal and/or non-verbal ways.
– Can initiate a conversation appropriately.
Students can make sense of the organisation of
reference books (dictionaries, encyclopaedias,
textbooks) in order to look for help.
– Can check the spelling of unfamiliar words.
– Can look up words to decide when they are
used.
Functions 3.1 and 3.2 should be treated sequentially first, and may be integrated later on. Function
3.1 focuses on making comparisons, and provides an appropriate context for presentation of items of
clothing and the use of demonstrative adjectives (this that – these those), which are recycled from
1st grade, Unit 2. In this function, there should be a focus on speaking and listening, although some
written materials (e.g. magazine/newspaper advertisements, catalogues, etc.), as well as advertisements
on Internet, can be used as cues for oral production.
Function 3.2 emphasizes oral communication in the context of shopping for clothes and most of the
language to be practised should be presented and treated as fixed expressions. Written production will
be limited to the creation of advertisements or catalogues. If the school has a computer room, students
could view some attractive Internet pages where different types of clothes are advertised. In order to find them, search the name of a store, clothes brand or the words ‘clothes advertisements’ in any search
engine. This activity can be used for vocabulary expansion and for parallel text writing. If students are
interested in the topic and there is enough time, they could create their own clothes shop and advertise
it on-line by creating a web page. There are many sites where new pages can be designed for free, like
http://geocities.yahoo.com, which provides tools for web page creation and easy to follow instructions.
To prepare for evaluation of oral skills, the teacher can ask students to bring in some items of clothing to
be used as items for sale. Evaluation should focus on vocabulary, on the appropriate use of comparisons
and appropriate interaction in the context of shopping.
Using the language of the unit, students could produce an advertisement/catalogue where they make
comparisons and add information about the items to buy/sell like prices, sizes, etc. The focus of evaluation
should be on the use of comparative forms and spelling. Written production can be included in students’
portfolios.




















ZONA ESCOLAR O43, SECTOR O6, TEHUACÁN.
ESCUELA: ISAAC OCHOTERENA  CICLO ESCOLAR:    2011 - 2012   GRADO:     2º   GRUPO: __”C”__
PROFESOR: INGLES II                                                   FECHA: _________________
UNIT 4 House and Home
        UNIT PURPOSE: The purpose of this unit is to enable students to describe their homes and learn about other people´ s homes.

LESSONS
TEAM

Social Practice

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE
REFLECTION ON LANGUAGE
STRATEGIC COMPETENCE

UNIT FOCUS
1
2
3

4

5


6

7
8

9

10

11


12



13

14
15


16


17


18



19


20
21
My house
Look at this bedroom
 There is a cake in the oven
There are my favorite jeans
There aren’t any tissues in the  bathroom
There’s a lamp on the night table
 Minicheck
Where is the lemonade?
Is there an apartment for rent?
Are there nine floors in the building.
This apartment is nicer
The Zaragoza apartment is bigger than the Hidalgo Ave.
apartment
The white sofa is more expensive
Minicheck
Project: Classified advertisements. Part one
Project: Classified advertisements. Part two
Project: Classified advertisements. Part three
Project: Classified advertisements. Part four
Project: Classified advertisements. Part five
Review. Part one
Review. Part two
Answer Key/
21 sessions, 7 weeks/

Giving and obtaining factual information of a personal
and non-personal kind.
4.1. Describing accommodation
Sample productions: There’s an apartment/a house for rent/sale in my building/block/…;
There are three rooms/two bathrooms/… (there/in my apartment); There’s a large/beautiful studio/living room/… and a small bathroom/kitchen/…(in his/her house); My bedroom is larger/nicer than my sister’s/the studio; The bedroom/dining room/… is opposite/next to/…
the entrance/dining room/…; Are there any closets/bookcases/…?; Yes there are; No, there aren’t
(any) (, but there’s a chest of drawers); What’s your room/house/... like?; It’s a small room/a large apartment/...; There’s a lamp beside the bed and a computer on my desk; There are two bedrooms on the second floor/next to the bathroom/...; How many posters/pictures/… are there/do you have?; (There are/I have) Two/Four/…; Where’s the bathroom?; It’s at the end of the hall/next to the kitchen.



Social Practice
Performance Evidence

Performance Evidence

Students can recognize and understand quotidian texts (brochures, advertisements, magazine/ newspaper articles, classified advertisements, letters/e-mails and conversations) in order to use them purposefully (obtain the characteristics of accommodation, make comparisons).
– Can use knowledge of the world and clues (illustrations) to make predictions about the texts.
– Can identify the overall message and some details (location, numbers, characteristics of accommodation and parts of a house) and discriminate relevant from irrelevant information, in order to identify a place/item in the house, determine which place is bigger/better, complete/expand a text and/or respond to a conversation.
– Can infer some information such as location of rooms/furniture, size of the house/room, location of speakers in relation to a map.
Can infer from the data provided by the text, knowledge of the world and/or L1, some implicit information (state of accommodation, characteristics of location).
– Can infer the meaning of unfamiliar words related to accommodation from the context within which they are presented, based on content as well as on knowledge of the world and/or L1.
– Can express own judgment and make recommendations about the information contained in texts regarding accommodation.
Students can use language creatively and appropriately by selecting lexis, phrases and grammatical resources in order to produce short, relevant texts (brochure, advertisement, classified advertisement, letter/e-mail, conversation) regarding descriptions of accommodation.
– Can follow structured models of spoken/written language to give information about accommodation.
– Can use knowledge of the world to anticipate type of information required, expected ways of interaction and possible language needed when describing accommodation.
– Can produce some fixed expressions with appropriate stress, rhythm and intonation when giving/
asking for information about accommodation.
– Can identify the purpose for writing a description of accommodation, intended audience and type  of text required (brochure, advertisement, classified advertisement, letter/e-mail); and generate and organize ideas coherently with the help of peers, the teacher or by consulting different sources of information.
– Can produce a skeleton of the text to be written, identifying and establishing the basic organization
of components (brochure: heading, subheadings, body; advertisement: heading, body; classified advertisement: heading, body; letter/e-mail: introduction, body, conclusions), with the help of peers, the teacher or a similar text.
– Can produce individual sentences in preparation to write a brochure, advertisement, classified advertisement, letter/e-mail, and join them later using some linking devices (“,”, and, but) in order to make the text coherent.
– Can concentrate separately on content or form, with the help of peers, the teacher or similar texts, to make adequate corrections on a first draft and produce a final version of the text.
– Can illustrate appropriately the brochure or advertisement produced.


Students notice:
• that there is and there are indicate existence in
singular and plural forms respectively
• the different meanings that a single term may
have depending on the context of use (sink, yard)
• that some prepositions indicate location (on, in, in
front of, between, next to, behind)
• that some linking devices indicate addition (“,”,
and) while others indicate contrast (but) and use such language features appropriately.

Students can use some verbal and/or non-verbal information to ease and enrich ommunication.
– Can rely on gestures, facial expressions and visual context.
– Can adjust pace according to punctuation
marks when reading aloud/silently.
Students can recognize when confused and
cope with not being able to understand parts of written/oral texts.
– Can tolerate ambiguity.
Students can recognize when confused and use verbal and/or non-verbal language to repair communication breakdowns.
– Can paraphrase.
– Can re-read.
Function 4.1
Recycles and consolidates language from Unit 3 (making comparisons) and introduces the use of there is/are for descriptions of places. In addition, vocabulary regarding parts of the house should be presented in this unit. The function provides enough opportunities to extend and consolidate study of certain language areas from 1st grade such as prepositions of place from Units 2 and 5 and there is/are
from Unit 5, as well as adjectives for descriptions from Unit 1 of 2nd grade.
To evaluate writing, students could produce a classified advertisement or a brochure describing a house/ an apartment. Half of the class could write a classified advertisement to sell/rent a house/an apartment and the other half to buy/rent accommodation. Written production can later be included in students’
The advertisements can also be used to evaluate speaking, through a task in which students try to find accommodation that matches the requirements of their advertisement.























ZONA ESCOLAR O43, SECTOR O6, TEHUACÁN.
ESCUELA: ISAAC OCHOTERENA  CICLO ESCOLAR:    2011 - 2012   GRADO:     2º   GRUPO: __”C”__
PROFESOR: INGLES II                                                   FECHA:_________________
UNIT 5: Past Times
     UNIT PURPOSE:  The purpose of this unit is to enable students to describe past events in their life and that of others.
LESSONS
TEAM

Social Practice

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE
REFLECTION ON LANGUAGE
STRATEGIC COMPETENCE

UNIT FOCUS
1
2

3
4

5
6
7
8
9

10
11

12



13


14


15
16

17
18
19

20

21

22
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29
30
A new student
I went to visit my grandmother
When I was a child
Could you read well when you were ten
I couldn’t use a computer
Minicheck
We visited Veracruz
We visited the zoo
The legend of two volcanoes
My diary
Last weekend I went to the movies
Project: Making an entertainment magazine. Part one
Project: Making an entertainment magazine. Part two
Project: Making an entertainment magazine. Part three
I didn’t clean my bedroom
Did you study for the math exam?.
Did you iron your uniform?
Minicheck
Read about an important person
Where did you go last weekend?
Who was the last Aztec emperor?
Tlaloc, the rain god Project: Making a book of tales. Part one.
Project: Making a book of tales. Part  two
Project: Making a book of tales. Part three
Project: Making a book of tales. Part four
Project: Making a book of tales. Part five
Project: Making a book of tales. Part six

Review. Part one
Review. Part two
Answer key/
30 sessions, 10 weeks/

Giving and obtaining factual information of a personal
and non-personal kind
5.1. Expressing ability and inability in the past
Sample productions:
When I was a child/Two years ago/…, I could run very fast; He/She couldn’t
speak English when he/she went to England for the first time/in 2004/…; Could you read/ride
a bike/… when you were 5 (years old)/were in preschool/…?; Yes, I could; No, I couldn’t (, but I cold skate/climb trees/…).
5.2. Expressing past events
Sample productions:
Studied for the Spanish exam/watched TV/… yesterday/last night/…;
Did you visit the zoo/enjoy that film/…(when you went to Mexico City)?; Yes, I did; No, I didn’t;
Was it/the weather/… OK/nice/…?; Yes, it was; No, it wasn’t; What did you do last weekend/on
Saturday/…?; I played soccer/had lunch with my uncle/…; Where did he/she stay (when he/she
went to Acapulco)?; (He/She stayed) With some friends/In a small hotel/…; What was the best
thing from Los Cabos/the disco/…?; The people/The music/…

Students can recognize and understand quotidian texts (letters/e-mails, magazine/newspaper articles,
anecdotes and conversations) in order to use them purposefully (obtain information about (in)abilities
– Can use knowledge of the world and clues (illustrations) to make predictions about the texts.
– Can identify the overall message and some details (sequencers, actions) and discriminate relevant
from irrelevant information, in order to establish a sequence of events, identify main actions/people/ places complete/expand a text and/or respond to a conversation.
Can infer feelings and attitudes of others.
Students can recognize and understand academic texts (historical articles and biographies) in order to
compare with the rest of the class their own interpretation and judgment of such texts.
– Can obtain information from texts and register it in charts, diagrams and notes.
– Can use maps, photographs and charts in texts to increase their knowledge about past situations.
Students recognize and understand short literary texts (tales and fragments of stories) in order to
comment on the feelings generated by them.
– Can identify characters, main events and their sequence.
– Can relate topics, events, characters and conflicts described in texts to own experience.
Students can use language creatively and appropriately by selecting lexis, phrases and grammatical resources in order to produce short, relevant texts (letter/e-mail, story, diary, biography, conversation) regarding (in) ability in the past and past events.
– Can use knowledge of the world to anticipate type of information required, expected ways of interaction and possible language needed when expressing past events.
– Can produce connected speech with adequate stress, rhythm and intonation when narrating past events.
– Can pronounce intelligibly final consonant sounds at the end of regular verbs in the past (/t/ /d/
/id/).
– Can identify the purpose for writing a narrative in the past, intended audience and type of text required (letter/e-mail, story, diary, biography); and generate and organize ideas coherently with the help of peers, the teacher or by consulting different sources of information.
– Can produce a skeleton of the text to be written, identifying and establishing the basic organization
of components (letter/e-mail, story: introduction, body, conclusions), with the help of peers, the teacher or a similar text.
– Can produce individual sentences in preparation to write a letter/e-mail, story, biography, and join
or sequence them later using some linking devices (but, when, then, after that) in order to make the text
coherent.
– Can concentrate separately on content or form, with the help of peers, the teacher or similar texts, to
make adequate corrections on a first draft and produce a final version of the text.

Students notice:
that the modal verb could indicates past ability
and has a regular form for all persons
• that the past simple tense indicates actions/
situations that started and finished at a certain
moment in the past
• that the past simple tense has a regular form for
all persons (e.g. I studied English, He studied
English, We studied English)
• that the suffix –ed indicates the past form of most
verbs (regular verbs)
• the use of do as a main verb (e.g. I did my homework
last night) or as an auxiliary verb in questions
(e.g. What time did you do your homework?) and in
negative statements (e.g. I didn’t do my homework)
• changes in spelling at the end of regular verbs
in the past (e.g. stop stopped, use used, study studied, etc.)
• that some words are used to replace nouns (e.g.
I enjoyed the party. It was wonderful; Romeo and
Juliet belonged to enemy families. They died young; I really liked Oaxaca. I went there last year.)
• that some linking devices indicate contrast (but)
while others indicate sequence (when, then, after
• differences in final consonant sounds of regular
verbs in the past (e.g. watch watched /t/, dance danced /d/, visit visited /id/, etc.) and use such language features appropriately.

Students can use some verbal and/or non-verbal information to ease and enrich communication.
– Can adjust pace according to punctuation marks when reading aloud/silently.
Students can recognize when confused and cope with not being able to understand parts of written/oral texts.
– Can tolerate ambiguity.
– Can wonder if a given text makes sense.
Students can recognize when confused and use verbal and/or non-verbal language to repair communication breakdowns.
– Can repeat/ask for repetition.
– Can refer to dictionary entries.
– Can self-correct pronunciation.
– Can re-read.
– Can ask for/give the spelling/meaning of a
word.
Students can give/take the floor sensitively in
verbal and/or non-verbal ways.
– Can indicate a need to intervene in a conversation.
Students can make sense of the organization of
reference books (dictionaries, encyclopedias,
textbooks) in order to look for help.
– Can check the spelling of unfamiliar words.
– Can check the pronunciation of unfamiliar Word.

Functions 5.1 and 5.2 should be treated sequentially and could be integrated later, if desired. Function
5.1 is used to introduce the concept of the past. The structure should be fairly easy for students because
it is regular (e.g. I/you/he/they could ride a bike), and because they are familiar with can for ability in the
present, which was introduced in Unit 1. Therefore, this function should take less time than the following one, and there should be an emphasis on oral communication.
The unit is an introduction to describing the past, and Function 5.2 places an emphasis on regular verbs.
Some common irregular verbs may occur incidentally (e.g. do, go), but the teacher should concentrate on regular forms. This function naturally lends itself to substantial work with written texts. If the teacher wishes to use Internet resources, some interesting texts can be found at http://www.biography.com or
http://www.encilopedia.com.
In order to evaluate writing, students can write the biography of a famous person from the past. This
can be done as a text expansion task. Fictitious stories could also be written in pairs; then students could share their productions with the rest of the group and decide which ones are the most imaginative.
Evaluation should concentrate on meaning and on the appropriate use of the past tense.
To evaluate speaking, students could first write a list of some activities/events in their lives that
happened in the recent past (e.g. last weekend, last week, etc.) and then use their list to interview others and find someone who did the same. Evaluation should concentrate on the use of and response to yes/no
questions.







1 comentario:

  1. SUPONGO QUE DONDE DICE TEAM, QUISO DECIR "TOPIC" O TAL VEZ PREFIERA THEME

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